College Basketball Advanced Statistics All-American Team

John Collins

Court Side Newspaper is proud to introduce the 2016/2017 season College Basketball Advanced Statistics and the 1st Team All-America Team. However, our selection is ONLY based on the advanced statistics of Player Efficiency Rating (PER). This is a one-number measure of a player’s per-minute productivity. It is an overall efficiency statistic that sums up a player’s positive accomplishments, subtracts the negative accomplishments, and returns a per-minute rating of a player’s performance.

JOHN COLLINS IS THE NCAA COLLEGE BASKETBALL PLAYER OF THE YEAR

John Collins College Basketball Advanced Statistics POY

Surprise, surprise the statistical player of the year was not Frank Mason but John Collins, the 6’10″ sophomore from Wake Forest. John Collins had the highest Player Efficiency Ranking in NCAA Division 1, while Frank Mason didn’t rank among the top 50. John Collins averaged 19.2 ppg and 9.9 rpg while also blocking 1.6 shots per game and connecting on 62 % of his field goal attempts. He did all of that in 26.6 minutes per game. Collins was also the 2016-17 ACC Most Improved Player after increasing his scoring average by 11.9 points per game from his freshman season.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1ST TEAM ALL-AMERICA

G – Nick Dixon, 6’2″ UT Pan American

G/F -Sindarius Thornwell, 6’5″ South Carolina

F – Mike Daum, 6’9″ South Dakota State

F/C – Michael Buchanan, 6’11″ USC Upstate

C – Jock Landale, 6’11″ St.Mary’s  

So where are Lorenzo Ball, Josh Hart, Justin Jackson, Frank Mason and Caleb Swanigan? Well, none of them ranked among the top-20 with their PER (although they were above average). The media and NBA scouts might be not be drooling over these small-school players but PER proves they had very productive seasons. 

ROKAS GUSTYS WAS THE “CHAIRMAN of the BOARDS”

Rokas Gustys

Rokas Gustys (6’9″, Hofstra) was a beast this season. He grabbed 26.7 % of all available rebounds while he was on the floor! In traditional stats, Caleb Swanigan led the NCAA D1 with an average of 12.4 rpg and he also ranked third in rebounding percentage. Why is there a discrepancy between advanced and traditional stats? Well, Swanigan played more minutes per game and had more time to collect his rebounds. Other dominant rebounders with a high rebound percentage were Bola Olaniyan (6’7″ Alabama) and Amadou Sidibe (6’8″ Fairfield).

LIAM THOMAS WAS THE MOST DOMINANT SHOTBLOCKER

Liam Thomas

Liam Thomas (6’10, Nicholls State ) had a block percentage of 14.9%. In other words, while he is on the floor he blocks almost one in every seven opponent field-goal attempts. Amazing! He also ranked 1st in the traditional statistic of average blocked shots per game (4.2). There were players who had a higher block percentage than Liam Thomas, like Moataz Aly (6’10″, CSU Bakersfield) and Sagaba Konate (6’8″, West Virginia) but they didn’t play many minutes.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF PASSERS

Cassius Winston

Cassius Winston (6’0″, Michigan State) had an assist percentage of 48.2% which means that while he was on the floor, he assisted 48.2 % of all his teammate’s field goals. One of the most unselfish players in the league was Lourawls Nairn (5’11″, Michigan State). His assist ratio was 42.5 (42.5 assists out of every 100 possessions he used). Maurice Watson (5’10″, Creighton) led the traditional statistical, even though he missed half the season, ranking with an average of 8.5 assists per game followed by Lonzo Ball (6’6″, UCLA) with 7.8.

Winston was just a freshman this last season and came off the bench most of the season. The Spartans will find more opportunities, and he gains more experience with the team over the upcoming seasons. If he continues, Winston might become a very special player at Michigan State.

These are just some of the advanced statistics that we have available. For more, please visit our Game Center.

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